Clove Oil

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Botanical Name: Syzygium aromaticum
Extraction Method: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Flower buds
Note: Middle
Odor: Warm, spicy, woody, with a slightly fruity top note
Country of Origin: Sri Lanka, Indonesia, and Madagascar
Use: This oil is usually associated with dental preparations due to its analgesic properties. Clove also has a long history in Chinese medicine.
Properties: Analgesic, antiaging, antibacterial, anticlotting, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, antioxidant, antiseptic, antiviral, carminative, expectorant, insecticide, stimulant
Blends Well With: Allspice, bay, bergamot, chamomile, clary sage, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, lemon, mandarin, palmarosa, rose, sandalwood, vanilla, ylang ylang
Safety Data: Avoid while pregnant and in liver and kidney conditions. May cause skin irritation.

Clove oil is largely composed of eugenol, a naturally occurring chemical in cloves that is the source of its antifungal, anesthetic, antibacterial, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and local anesthetic properties. Thanks to its generous spread of attributes, clove oil is a great first-aid source with a variety of uses.

As a powerful antiseptic, clove oil was once breathed through leather beaks by European doctors to help keep the plague away! Diffusing clove oil into the air helps to minimize airborne germs, and what is breathed in likewise works in the body. The spicy aroma has also been found to reduce drowsiness, depression, irritability, and headaches, assist memory recall, and increase circulation. For a cheering winter blend, try mixing clove, cassia, and orange oil in a diffuser or add drops to water in a spray bottle.

The health benefits of clove oil can be attributed to its antimicrobial, antifungal, antiseptic, antiviral, aphrodisiac and stimulating properties. The oil is used for treating a variety of health disorders including toothaches, indigestion, cough, asthma, headache, stress and blood impurities. The most important and common use of clove oil is in dental care. Several toothpastes, mouth wash and oral care medications contain clove oil as an important ingredient.

Clove is an evergreen tree, which produces a flower bud that has numerous medicinal properties. It is often referred to as clove bud. Clove bud has a shaft and a head and hence it has the Latin name clavus, meaning nail. Clove was extensively used in ancient Indian and Chinese civilizations and it spread to other parts of the world, including Europe, during the seventh and eight centuries. Even now, clove is used in several Indian and Chinese dishes.

Clove is rich in minerals such as calcium, hydrochloric acid, iron, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and vitamin A and vitamin C.

This information is for educational purposes only, it is not intended to treat, cure, prevent or, diagnose any disease or condition. Nor is it intended to prescribe in any way. This information is for educational purposes only and may not be complete, nor may its data be accurate.

As with all essential oils, never use them undiluted. Do not take internally unless working with a qualified and expert practitioner. Keep away from children. If applying an essential oil to your skin always perform a small patch test to an insensitive part of the body (after you have properly diluted the oil in an appropriate carrier.)