Ginger Root Oil

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Botanical Name: Zingiber officinale
Extraction Method: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Root
Note: Middle
Odor: Fresh, warm, woody, sweet bright top note
Country of Origin: India
Use: Ginger is widely used in the food industry. It also has a history in the perfume industry, and is considered to have an oriental note to it.
Properties: Analgesic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aperitive, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, laxative, stimulant, stomachic, tonic
Blends Well With: Bergamot, cedarwood, clove, coriander, eucalyptus, frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lemon, lime, mandarin, neroli, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, ylang ylang

Ginger Oil is produced mainly in India. India is famous for its Cochin Ginger oil. The bulk of world Ginger oil exports are majorly from India. Indian soil and climatic conditions are conducive to producing and growing the best Zingiber officinale plants that yield outstanding quality Ginger oil.

Ginger is a perennial herb and grows to about 3 - 4 feet high with a thick spreading tuberous rhizome. Every year it shoots up a stalk with narrow spear-shaped leaves, as well as white or yellow flowers growing directly from the root. Ginger oil is steam distilled from the root of Zingiber officinale. It has a fresh, warm, woody, sweet bright top note and is pale yellow to dark amber in colour. The essential oil has various chemical constituents including the following: a-pinene, camphene, b-pinene, 1,8-cineole, linalool, borneol, y-terpineol, nerol, neral, geraniol, geranial, geranyl acetate, b-bisabolene and zingiberene.

Medicinally it has been used for ailments of the digestive system, for arthritis, bronchitis, bruises, chills, colds, colic, congestion, constipation, coughs, cramps, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, flatulence, flu, hangover, headaches, indigestion, loss of appetite, muscular aches and pains, nausea, nervous exhaustion, poor circulation, rheumatism, sinusitis, sore throat, sprains, toothache, travel and sea sickness, varicose veins, for catarrhal lung conditions, for bruises on the skin, to boost the heart, to help with mucus and phlegm, for fractures, carbuncles, hangovers, for motion sickness, morning sickness. Its warming qualities are good to use for feelings of loneliness and winter depression, and its energizing properties make it a good aphrodisiac. It helps to relieve spasms, aches and ease stiffness in joints.

It also has a history in the perfume industry, and is considered to have an oriental note to it. Ginger oil is widely used in the food industry. It may be added to a blend to be diffused into the air, or to a carrier oil and rubbed on the earlobes, temples, or base of the neck. It is used in burners and vaporizers, in bath, blended in base cream, and in hot compress.

This information is for educational purposes only, it is not intended to treat, cure, prevent or, diagnose any disease or condition. Nor is it intended to prescribe in any way. This information is for educational purposes only and may not be complete, nor may its data be accurate.

As with all essential oils, never use them undiluted. Do not take internally unless working with a qualified and expert practitioner. Keep away from children. If applying an essential oil to your skin always perform a small patch test to an insensitive part of the body (after you have properly diluted the oil in an appropriate carrier.)